This is the website of Clement Jewitt, PhD: composer, writer, etc.

 

A SHORT NOTE ON DISSONANCE (2011)

Remarks on the contexts of dissonance and consonance as a response to a query initiated by Andrew Hodges, the editor of the Sound Community Forum, and uploaded to that Forum.

 

MUSIC AND THE ARTS IN A POSSIBLE FUTURE (2010)

This article is published (Oct.2010) as a chapter in A New Renaissance: transforming science, spirit and society, eds David Lorimer and Oliver Robinson. Floris Books. Can be downloaded from Academia.edu

 

MUSIC AND THE ARTS IN A POSSIBLE FUTURE (early fun version 2009)

The document below is a verbal transcript of the contents of what was found to be some kind of memory stick, which I picked up in a wood recently, of an unfamiliar design, looking as if it had been left out in the rain.  It took the genius of a computer hardware friend to make an adapter for a USB port, for its plug end was unlike any we have seen.  Read more  Posted to the Sound Community Forum Dec 2009

 

PARTICIPATIVE SPIRITUAL INQUIRY AND THE MUSIC & PSYCHE ENTERPRISE (2009)

The Common Ground Report (CGR) exhibits similarities with reports of outcomes of group musical improvisation modalities developed within the Music & Psyche Network (M&P). Download from Academia.edu   A version of this was published in Network Review: journal of the Scientific and Medical Network, No.99, Spring 2009; posted to the Sound Community Forum Feb 2010

 

OURSELVES AND OTHER ANIMALS (2005)

In this little article I want to take a brief look at some of the attitudes we humans hold towards other beings living on this planet, in particular the appalling treatment meted out to other animals in various parts of our culture, and the causes and some important consequences of that. Read more.  A version of this article utilising as section headings the phrases of the Quaker Advices & Queries No.42 was published in Quaker Voices Vol.3/No.3, May 2012. The text is : 'We do not own the world, and its riches are not ours to dispose of at will. Show a loving consideration for all ceatures, and seek to maintain the beauty and variety of the world. Work to ensure that our increasing power over nature is used responsibly, with reverence for life. Rejoice in the splendour of God's continuing creation.'

 

LABYRINTH: MYTH, MEANING & SYMBOL (2003)

Each man’s life is a labyrinth at the centre of which lies his own death, and even after death it may be that he passes through a final maze before it is all ended for him. Michael Ayrton.  Can be downloaded from  academia.edu   This article was published in Music & Psyche Journal, Jan 2004, in White Dragon Nos 41 & 42, Beltane and Lughnasa 2004, and elswhere on the web in full and abstracted.  It has attracted a lot of attention, for example from the Triplehorses Druid Grove, Oregon, USA, who wrote "This is GREAT!!!" or from Pippa Merivale: "It's good good food, I feel the energy moving through me as I read. You've clearly delved deep into mythology in your life, this stuff is rich and deep."

 

MECHANISMS AND SHADOWS: THREE COMPOSERS MUSE ON LIFE AND WESTEN ART MUSIC (2002) - with John Burke & Maxwell Steer

In August 2002 an article by Geoffrey Hindley was posted to the MusicPsyche Yahoo Discussion Group entitled Keyboards, Cranks and Communication: the Musical Mindset of Western Technology, which proposed that ‘the mindset of western art music is at the core of modern world techno-culture.’ Read more   Published in Music & Psyche Journal, Feb 2003

 

MUSICMAKING AND HEALING THE BREACH (1999/2000)

In the eons long life of the world soul, each great revolution on the axis mundi corresponds to an age in the slow working out of the destiny of our own ancient but still young species. And we fnd ourselves now at the edge of a new circum-vivification, mythos, noumenon, world view, opening up to our as yet uncertain gaze.  Read more   Published in Music & Psyche Journal, Nov 2001; posted to the Sound Community Forum Aug 2010.  Or can be downloaded from Academia.edu

 

MUSIC AT THE BAUHAUS (2000)

An expansion of the Appendix to the article below.  Published in Tempo 213, July 2000

 

A SURVEY OF THE BAUHAUS 1919-1933 IN CONTEXT, AND OF THE DIASPORA AND CONSEQUENCES TO THE PRESENT DAY (1997)

 ' The Bauhaus was a kind of school; but not a school that prepared its pupils for the world outside.  Rather it was the other way round; that society went to the Bauhaus to unlearn everything it knew, to discover how to live in the modern world.'  Guy Brett.  Phenomenon of the Bauhaus.  The Times, Friday September 20th, 1968.Can be downloaded from Academia.edu   Illustrations 1-1920-2728-3738-44 

 

THE NEW LIBRARIANS: VALUABLE IDEAS IN NEW WORLDS (1985)

The purpose of this article is to examine a little some of the ways in which the principles of librarianship may be producing beneficial effect in other fields, owing to the mobility of trained librarians caused partly by those dark aspects of the body economic, job stagnation and redundancy, and partly by growing opportunities.  Read more   Published in New Library World v.86/1018, April 1985.

 

ONE MAN'S MAGIC (1983)

For three months in 1983 I authored a column with that title (flattering, really) over the psudonym Clement Francis, in a new newspaper-style magazine venture named Fieldfare, which was intended to be read by people interested in outdoor leisure activities. My remit was to feature interesting parts of Britain for trips out. The graphic shown here was placed under the column heading: I don't recall who drew it. When the third contribution was being proofed, the financial backer for the project got prematurely nervous, and the venture closed down. Oh dear: the advertising was showing signs of growing, as were sales. That was the end of my career in journalism!—other work was demanding fuller attention. The columns were, The Weald of Kent, Coming Up to Cader, about the southern approach to Wales' second highest mountain, and Ridge and Valley, following an ancient track across the Cotswolds.

 

VISIT TO A LIBRARY (c.1970)

This spoof SF story aimed to tickle the fancies of ardent technological futurists in the library world.   However it got no further than the Library School magazine where I was training for that profession.  It has a look at a possible future from the perspective of a much further future.  All the clues are there for anyone interested in fleshing out my sparse remarks.  It might amuse you.